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Anna Alstatt talks about her life as a young Swedish immigrant in Kansas, and about homesteading and homemaking in Mack, Colorado. The interview was conducted by the Mesa County Oral History Project, a collaboration of Mesa County Libraries, the Museums of Western Colorado and the Mesa County Historical Society.
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Joel and Jennie Brewster talk about farming and raising thousands of turkeys in Mack, Colorado, and Jennie describes how she used to take the turkeys for a walk. They also talk about life in Mack. This recording is made available via signed release by the Mesa County Oral History Project, a collaboration of Mesa County Libraries and the Museums of Western Colorado.
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Veda McBeth talks about people and places of Mack, Colorado, where her family owned and operated the general store in the early Twentieth century. She describes in detail the colorful hobos that she encountered along the railroad, the thousands of sheep in the Mack stockyards, and large sheep drives to Grand Junction. She also speaks about catching the Denver Rio Grande train from Mack to Grand Junction, the Uintah Railway, and the loneliness of homestead...
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Lois Saunders talks about early life in Fruita, Loma, and Mack, Colorado, about life on a farm with her husband Roe Saunders, and about Colorado Mesa University’s Saunders Field House, which was named for her husband. The interview was conducted by the Mesa County Oral History Project, a collaboration of Mesa County Libraries, the Museums of Western Colorado and the Mesa County Historical Society.
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A rancher near Kannah Creek in Mesa County, Colorado who made his money digging the grade for a Denver & Rio Grande rail line. The line was located near Mack, and never used. After digging the grade in the late 1910’s, he had enough money to purchase a large ranch.
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In the early Twentieth century, country schools from Mesa County gathered in Lincoln Park to hold a field day, with graduation ceremonies following in the Lincoln Park Barn. According to oral history interviewee Bertha Schlegel, attendees included students from schools in Pomona, Plateau Valley, Molina, Collbran, Loma, Mack, the Redlands, Clifton, Orchard Mesa, Escalante and Glade Park. Schlegel attended her field days in the 1920's.
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A railway line the Gilson Manufacturing Company created that ran from Crevasse, Colorado (later known as Mack, Colorado) to Black Dragon in order to mine natural asphalt from the Black Dragon uintaite vein. According to Mesa County History Project interviewee Harry Sylvester Godby, the railroad served as the postal service for the route, delivering to mailboxes along the way. A passenger could board the train by waiting at one of the mailboxes...
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She was born in Nebraska. Her mother died when she was young, and her father left her and her brother with their grandparents in Oklahoma. She married Joel Brewster on June 11, 1927, while she was working at the Harvey House in Flagstaff, Arizona. They moved to Mesa County, Colorado in 1931, and bought a small farm in Mack, Colorado. In 1946, they bought a turkey ranch, where they raised turkeys by the thousands. She would take the turkeys for a walk...
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She was born in Montrose County, Colorado. By 1896, when she was six years old, she and her family were living on the Brink place in Fruita. They moved to what became known as Snooks Bottom around 1900, named for the homestead founded there by her parents William Tunis Snook and Clara Zillah (Park) Snook. The family lived there until 1910, when a reservoir constructed by resident families burst. They moved back to Fruita, where William purchased and...
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He was born in Ophir, Colorado to father James Gilligan Brewster and his mother David Ann (Kelley) Brewster. The 1900 US Census shows him living with his parents in San Juan County, Utah, when he was five. The family was living in Fruita, Colorado by 1910, when he was 15 years old. His father was a farmer and Joel was an only child. He married Jenny Ellen Menter on June 11, 1927, while he was working as a bridge inspector for the Santa Fe Railroad...
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He was born to Freeman Snook and Lydia (Soule) Snook in Clay, New York, near Syracuse. US Census Records from 1870 list his name as Judge Snook (The nickname "Judge" would seem to be derived from Judson, which was his given name according to his daughter Della (Snook) Mack). According to the 1875 New York State Census, he was married to Jane Snook, but the 1880 US Census shows Jane and their four children living by themselves in New York (though the...
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She was born in Utah to William Asbury and Priscilla Park. She married William Tunis Snook, and by 1885, the Colorado State Census shows them living together in Mesa County. They moved subsequently to Montrose County, where their son Guy was born. According to their daughter Della (Snook) Mack (as related in her letter read by Della's niece and oral history interviewee Ida Mae (Snook) Waggoner), the Snooks were back living on the Brink place in Fruita...
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The Mesa County Valley School District 51 was formed on November 27, 1950 from sixteen smaller school districts in Mesa County. These smaller districts, in turn, had formed as the result of prior consolidations. With the exception of De Beque and Plateau Valley, which formed their own school districts, every geographical area in the county became part of District 51. The District elected its first school board and appointed its first superintendent,...
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She was born in Utah to William E. and Isabel (Luts) Roberson. The 1900 US Census record shows her living in La Sal, Utah at the age of one. By 1910 the family was living in Moab, where her father was a sheep rancher. Sometime in her teens or twenties, the family moved east to Mack, Colorado, where her parents owned the general store. The family lived together in a home directly behind the store and Veda worked as a sales person. The 1920 US Census...
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She was born in Sweden on November 26, 1885 and left for the United States in 1910. She settled with her aunt and uncle in Kansas, where she was confirmed in the Lutheran faith. She moved to the Mack, Colorado area with her husband Albert Alstatt, where they homesteaded. She was a homemaker who raised five children on the farm.
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He grew up in Kansas and moved to Mack, Colorado with his wife, Anna (Nilsson) Alstatt, where they homesteaded.
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He was born in New York. He was the general manager of the Uintah Railway in the 1920’s and perhaps earlier. He lived in Mack, Colorado, where 1920 US Census records show him rooming in a boarding house at the age of fifty-nine. He was known colloquially as Captain Cooley, and was succeeded by Major Hood.
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He was born in Utah to Melvin O. and Ann McBeth. 1900 US Census records show him living with his parents in Payson, Utah at the age of two. He grew up on a farm in Payson. He served in the Utah National Guard during World War I, and was stationed in Europe from June 1918 to May 1919, when he was honorably discharged. He married Veda Roberson in Grand Junction, Colorado in 1921. Together they homesteaded in Westwater Canyon, about forty miles from...
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A cattle and sheep ranching operation that was owned by Rufus Tawney, which operated in the Minturn and Mack areas of Colorado beginning around 1905. When Rufus Tawney died in 1929, his grandson Rufus Hirons and the rest of the family decided to liquidate the company's assets. They did this six months before the Great Depression began, which allowed them to get a decent return.