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Early Appleton pioneer and founder of COPECO, a large fruit growing operation. The 1910 US Census lists him as the proprietor of a department store and he was the owner, along with William J. Moyer, of the Fair Store. The land on his farm was used as a picnic ground for the store's employees. He built a lavish house for his family on the property. He died in 1917. Census records show that by 1920 his widow, Lois Craven, had moved to Grand Junction....
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A California inmate in San Quentin Prison who was paroled by his mother into the supervision of Charles Lumley in Mesa County. With the help of two fellow parolees, Tommy Humotoff and Otis Slane, he started the COPECO dance hall in the 1920s, in an old barn and packing shed owned by his mother. The facility had been used previously by Elmer Craven for his COPECO fruit growing business in the Hunter District. Sadler frequented the Biltmore gambling...
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In December 1938, J.W. “Big Kid” Eames, who ran a gambling establishment called the Biltmore in the Reed Building at 3rd and Main Streets, was shot and killed by three masked robbers: Vern “Bubbles” Sadler, who ran the Copeco dance hall, and his friends and business partners Tommy Humotoff and Otis Slane. The three had worked robberies together in California, and had been paroled into the custody of Charley Lumley in Mesa County. The three...
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William J. Moyer was the Vice President of Grand Valley National Bank and the owner, along with Elmer Craven until his death, of the Fair Store in Grand Junction. He walked to the Fair Store from his home at 614 Ouray Avenue every day. He was a community philanthropist who provided the money needed to build the Moyer Natatorium, now known as the Lincoln Park-Moyer Pool. Moyer was also part owner of COPECO, a large fruit growing operation run by Elmer...
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Rose and Morgan Goss discuss the early settlement of Grand Junction and Fruita, Colorado, and agricultural life in the Appleton area. The interview was conducted by the Mesa County Oral History Project, a collaboration of Mesa County Libraries and the Museums of Western Colorado.
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Carl Forsman, the son of Swedish immigrants, talks about early life in the town of Mesa, Colorado. The interview was conducted by the Mesa County Oral History Project, a collaboration of Mesa County Libraries, the Museums of Western Colorado and the Mesa County Historical Society.
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Rufus Hirons talks about his education in Grand Junction schools, and about teachers and school district employees (including his father, Walter Hirons). He also touches on the Fruita to Grand Junction Interurban line, sheep ranching with his grandfather, and local Italian Americans. The interview was conducted by the Mesa County Oral History Project, a collaboration of Mesa County Libraries, the Museums of Western Colorado and the Mesa County Historical...
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Glenn McFall discusses downtown businesses and business owners in Grand Junction, Colorado, as well as the shoe store he worked at for nine years, McConnell-Lowes. Glenn also talks about the involvement of the Ku Klux Klan in the Grand Valley area, the Mesa County Pest House and Smallpox outbreaks, the social scene and where people went to go dancing, the Mesa County Fair, horse racing and gambling, bailing rowdy cowboys out of the local jail, Eddie...