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A branch of a revised version of the organization that began in 1915 and grew stronger in the 1920s. The Ku Klux Klan inflamed prevailing prejudices against Catholics, Jews, Blacks and immigrants, and promised a return to "Old Time Religion" and Americanism. As Colorado was a primarily Protestant state, the Klan's influence was particularly strong here during the 1920's. The Klan had several members in positions of power, including the governor,...
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Mary Price discusses what she knew about Walter Walker and his family, impressions of Walker held by Mesa County residents, social events the Walkers were involved in, the presence of the Ku Klux Klan in Grand Junction, and the Typographical Union Strike. She also talks about her German immigrant father, his ownership of the prominent LaCourt Hotel in Grand Junction, and his fear of the Klan. This recording is made available via signed release by...
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Dudley Mitchell discusses politicians involved in the early days of the railroad, the development of railroad labor laws, railroad wages, and the Ku Klux Klan in Grand Junction and Colorado. The interview was conducted by the Mesa County Oral History Project, a collaboration of Mesa County Libraries, the Museums of Western Colorado and the Mesa County Historical Society.
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Voice Recording
William “Bill” Nelson explains his time spent working for the Daily Sentinel under Walter Walker and Preston Walker. He discusses the Typographical Union Strike, the quality of The Daily Sentinel compared to other newspapers, the Ku Klux Klan in Grand Junction, and Walter Walker’s many community involvements. This recording is made available via signed release by the Mesa County Oral History Project, a collaboration of Mesa County Libraries...
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Compound
Glenn McFall discusses downtown businesses and business owners in Grand Junction, Colorado, as well as the shoe store he worked at for nine years, McConnell-Lowes. Glenn also talks about the involvement of the Ku Klux Klan in the Grand Valley area, the Mesa County Pest House and Smallpox outbreaks, the social scene and where people went to go dancing, the Mesa County Fair, horse racing and gambling, bailing rowdy cowboys out of the local jail, Eddie...
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Al Look discusses his 40-year employment with the Daily Sentinel, including his relationships with publishers Walter Walker and Preston Walker and the lives of the two men. He also discusses the Typographical Union Strike of 1946 and the hardships it caused between the union and the Sentinel. Al also talks about his and Walter Walker’s relationship with the Ku Klux Klan, Walker’s tolerance of the brothels on South Avenue, and Walker’s rivalry...
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Jeanette LeBeau, an early Mesa County resident, talks about climbing Independence Monument with bare feet, Ute Indians who visited her grandparents in pioneer Fruita, summers spent at Leach’s cattle ranch in Pinon Mesa, means of transportation, law enforcement, and prejudice against Catholics in the Grand Valley. The interview was conducted by the Mesa County Oral History Project, a collaboration of Mesa County Libraries and the Museums of Western...
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Dr. Peter Matteroli describes his time living in multiple buildings around downtown Grand Junction, including the YMCA building. Peter tells the story of his wild journey to take the Dental Board Exam in Salt Lake City, Utah, the trials and tribulations of opening up a dentist office in Grand Junction, getting shot in the ankle while rabbit hunting, his experience serving on the board of the Eagles Ball Club, and stories from the Grand Junction Lions...
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Gilbert Gordon talks about growing up in Trinidad, Colorado in the early Twentieth century and at length about the different ethnicities present in Trinidad at that time, with an emphasis on the Jewish population. He discusses some of the activities of the Ku Klux Klan around 1923, and how prejudice from the organization affected him. He also talks about operating Gordon department stores, a family owned chain. Both Gilbert and Mary go into life and...
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Rose and Morgan Goss discuss the early settlement of Grand Junction and Fruita, Colorado, and agricultural life in the Appleton area. The interview was conducted by the Mesa County Oral History Project, a collaboration of Mesa County Libraries and the Museums of Western Colorado.
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Person
A state senator who was elected from the Grand Junction area. He fell in with the Ku Klux Klan, and was elected as Lieutenant Governor on the coattails of Klansman Clarence Morely in 1925. When the Klan fell out of favor, it ended Lacey’s career.
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He was born in Saguache, Colorado and came to the Grand Valley area in 1906, where he worked for two of the early day harness shops. He eventually started a harness shop of his own, but went bankrupt during the Great Depression. Clarence then attempted to open a second business, Grand Junction Canvas and Leather, but that went bankrupt as well. He was an active member of the Ku Klux Klan and ran for city council in 1941, but lost.
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He was born in Ohio to an Irish immigrant father and German immigrant mother. Along with Mr. Lowe, he was the owner of the McConnell-Lowe shoe store in Grand Junction, Colorado. He was Glenn McFall’s boss, and a devout Catholic, which at the time caused him trouble from the Ku Klux Klan. Their discriminatory practices adversely affected his business.
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He was the publisher of The Daily Sentinel and a leading Democrat in Grand Junction, Colorado. He became the state Democratic Party chairman in the 1920's. He was behind the deal of William Moyer to build a community swimming pool in Lincoln Park, and the deal that brought in the Fruit Grower’s Association. He also backed the Goodwill and Salvation Army charities. He was an organizer of the campaign to build the Avalon Theater and brought acts...
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A doctor from Grand Junction, Colorado. He was born in Pennsylvania, the son of German immigrants. In 1916, he traveled to Mesa through heavy snow in order to treat Willard Foster, the dying three-year-old son of Anna (Barker) Foster. He was considered one of the top surgeons in Grand Junction in the 1920's. 1920 U.S. Census records show him married to Maud (Wright) Sickenberger. After she passed away he married again, this time to Laura Eula Young...
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Glen McFall was born in Nebraska to Elmer McFall, a rancher, and Clara (Jordan) McFall, a school teacher and homemaker. He attended grade school in Nebraska and then moved to Clifton, Colorado at the age of six, after Clara McFall separated from Elmer. He attended eighth grade at the Clifton School, and then bicycled to school at Grand Junction High School until his family moved into town. He was a nine-year employee of McConnell-Lowes, a shoe...
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Clem Goettelman explains his time as an employee for The Daily Sentinel under Preston Walker as the publisher. He discusses his position as a union leader before the Typographical Union Strike, conflicts within the work environment, Walter Walker’s involvement with and subsequent opposition to the Ku Klux Klan, and The Daily Sentinel being one of the only papers in the country to quickly cover President Theodore Roosevelt’s death with a full...
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Gilbert Baylis explains his relationship with former United States Senate appointee Walter Walker’s son, Preston, who was a close friend of his growing up. Baylis describes Preston Walker as a very popular fellow and a friendly rival to him. Baylis also discusses his own education in politics, and Walter and Preston’s family life and social activities. This recording is made available via signed release by the Mesa County Oral History Project,...
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Dr. Addie (Russell) Maynard tells stories of her life as an osteopathic doctor in Mesa County, Colorado, including a time when she helped a woman give birth on a train with barely any supplies. She also touches on the social life in Grand Junction when she was a child, changes throughout the years in the practice of medicine, and the various medical resources available to early Mesa County residents. The interview was conducted by the Mesa County...
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Daily Sentinel writer William “Bill” Nelson talks about the history of the Grand Valley irrigation system during the early days of Mesa County. Nelson describes how water projects were developed, how water is doled out to people in the area, and specific water rights. He also discusses his family life, community activism, his father’s failing businesses during the Great Depression, and experiencing surgery on his retina. The interview was conducted...